Monday, December 9, 2019

You Can't Handle the Truth (What Narrative Fascinates You?)

Ed.'s note: A good refresher article to show again what Americans are up against. We are being blasted 24 hours a day with hard core military grade propaganda warfare (privatized). What we see here is military grade psychological warfare on the public creating entirely faked events to run cover for actual events that are happening. With Strategic Communication Laboratories's (SCL) assets embedded in the media, it then farms out disinformation stories to their embedded operatives. This psychological warfare operation can be implemented and carefully managed to spoof an entire city. In the United States and other countries, SCL has generated public scandal mainly through its subsidiary Cambridge Analytica.

Take this information and examine "mass shootings" in America like at the Sandy Hook shooting, the Parkland, Florida shooting in February, 2018 and the Tree of Life Synagogue mass shooting in October, 2018. Once is a coincidence; twice is suspect; three times is a pattern. We see you, BuzzFeed. What's your job? Witnesses at "mass shootings?"

Here's another fake operation. Even George got sent a pipe bomb only hand delivered from Florida. Note carefully how President Trump's critics were sent pipe bombs. Who are President Trump's most public critics today? Think carefully now...

What we know about the suspicious packages sent to top Democrats, Trump critics and CNN

Here's another job. Rabbi Jonathan Berkun who is mentioned in this article, is the son of Rabbi Alvin Berkun who was at the Tree of Life Synagogue in October, 2018 but decided not to show up at the synagogue when it was allegedly attacked. This alleged attack happened in 2016.

Plot to blow up Aventura synagogue ends with man's arrest
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Source: Slate

Psy-ops propaganda goes mainstream.

September 9, 2005 | By SHARON WEINBERGER

Download the MP3 audio version of this story here, or sign up to get all of Slate's free daily podcasts.

LONDON—Over the past 24 hours, seven people have checked into hospitals here with telltale symptoms. Rashes, vomiting, high temperature, and cramps: the classic signs of smallpox. Once thought wiped out, the disease is back and threatening a pandemic of epic proportions.

The government faces a dilemma: It needs people to stay home, but if the news breaks, mass panic might ensue as people flee the city, carrying the virus with them.

A shadowy media firm steps in to help orchestrate a sophisticated campaign of mass deception. Rather than alert the public to the smallpox threat, the company sets up a high-tech "ops center" to convince the public that an accident at a chemical plant threatens London. As the fictitious toxic cloud approaches the city, TV news outlets are provided graphic visuals charting the path of the invisible toxins. Londoners stay indoors, glued to the telly, convinced that even a short walk into the streets could be fatal.

This scenario may sound like a rejected plot twist from a mediocre Bond flick, but one company is dead set on making this fantasy come to life.

Strategic Communication Laboratories, a small U.K. firm specializing in "influence operations" made a very public debut this week with a glitzy exhibit occupying prime real estate at Defense Systems & Equipment International, or DSEi, the United Kingdom's largest showcase for military technology. The main attraction was a full-scale mock-up of its ops center, running simulations ranging from natural disasters to political coups.

Just to the right of the ops center, a dark-suited man with a wireless microphone paces like a carnival barker, narrating the scenarios. Above him a screen flashes among scenes of disaster, while to his right, behind thick glass, workers sit attentively before banks of computer screens, busily scrolling through data. The play actors pause only to look up at a big board that flashes ominously between "hot spots" like North Korea and Congo.

While Londoners fret over fictitious toxins, the government works to contain the smallpox outbreak. The final result, according to SCL's calculations, is that only thousands perish, rather than the 10 million originally projected. Another success.

Of course, the idea of deluding an entire city seems, well, a bit like propaganda.

"If your definition of propaganda is framing communications to do something that's going to save lives, that's fine," says Mark Broughton, SCL's public affairs director. "That's not a word I would use for that."

Then again, it's hard to know exactly what else to call it. (Company literature describes SCL's niche specialties as "psychological warfare," "public diplomacy," and "influence operations.") The smallpox scenario plays out in excruciating detail how reporters would be tapped to receive disinformation, with TV and radio stations dedicated to around-the-clock coverage. Even the eventual disclosure is carefully scripted.

In another doomsday scenario, the company assists a newly democratic country in South Asia as it struggles with corrupt politicians and a rising insurgency that threatens to bubble over into bloody revolution. SCL steps in to assist the benevolent king of "Manpurea" to temporarily seize power.

Oh, wait, that sounds a lot like Nepal, where the monarchy earlier this year ousted a corrupt government to stave off a rising Maoist movement. The problem is, the SCL scenario also sounds a lot like using a private company to help overthrow a democratically elected government. Another problem, at least in Nepal, is that the king now shows few signs of returning to democracy.

The company, which describes itself as the first private-sector provider of psychological operations, has been around since 1993. But its previous work was limited to civil operations, and it now wants to expand to military customers.

If SCL weren't so earnest, it might actually seem to be mocking itself, or perhaps George Orwell. As the end of the smallpox scenario, dramatic music fades out to a taped message urging people to "embrace" strategic communications, which it describes as "the most powerful weapon in the world." And the company Web page offers some decidedly creepy asides. "The [ops center] can override all national radio and TV broadcasts in time of crisis," it says, alluding to work the company has done in an unspecified Asian country.

The government's use of deception in the service of national security is not new. During World War II, for example, Allied forces conducted a massive misinformation campaign, called Operation Fortitude, designed to hide plans for the Normandy invasion. More recent efforts have met with controversy, however. In 2002, the Pentagon shuttered its brand new Office of Strategic Influence after public outcry over its purported plans to spread deceptive information to the foreign press.

Please go to Slate to read the entire article.
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Strategic Communications Laboratories- London


Related:

This Is How the Financial Kickback Scam Works Out of the US State Department (RICO Operation)







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