Friday, November 6, 2020

We Discovered the Solution to America's Presidential Election Controversy

Ed.'s note: Well why not President Trump? When Juan Guaidó declared himself as the new President of Venezuela under some kind of a new democratic political process in Venezuela endorsed by the US government, you gave him all the credibility he needed by recognizing him. Guaidó even received a standing ovation in the US House of Representatives as President Trump gave his state of the union address. Everyone one of us Mr. President, "has hopes, dreams and aspirations" just like the Venezuelans do when Guaidó walked in out of nowhere and declared himself president of Venezuela. President Trump, you recognized a man who just declared himself president of a country by attempting to oust a democratically elected leader. Pelosi even backed that support of Guaidó. Why? Because Guaidó declared it so. We want to restore democracy in America just like Juan Guaidó wanted to "restore democracy" in Venezuela. Here is our new president. This is how it is done, President Trump, Venezuelan style. 

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Source: CounterPunch

I Declare Myself President of the United States of America

February 1, 2019 | BY GARRY LEECH

I, Garry Leech, declare myself president of the United States of America. There I did it. I am now the leader of the most powerful nation on earth. "By what right?" you ask. By the right of the new democratic political process recently implemented in Venezuela and endorsed by the US government. This is how I am restoring democracy in the United States. In the same manner that the new self-declared president of Venezuela, Juan Guaidó, with the backing of the US government, is restoring democracy in Venezuela: through the ouster of a democratically elected leader.

Now I realize that most US Americans have never heard of me, but only one in four Venezuelans had heard of Guaidó before he declared himself president of Venezuela on January 22nd. And you might argue that I have never run for national office in the United States. But that also didn't stop Guaidó. Finally, you might declare that such a move on my part is unconstitutional. And you’d be correct. But that also didn’t prevent Guaidó from declaring himself president. Nor did it stop the United States, Canada and a handful of other imperialist nations from recognizing him. Apparently, democracy in the 21st century doesn't require abiding by constitutions; nor does it require elections. And so, following the precedent established by Guaidó and his foreign backers, I unilaterally declare myself president of the United States as part of this new democratic order.

One thing that Guaidó does have going for him that I don't at this point is foreign recognition of his self-declared presidency. But I intend to fix that by working covertly with the governments of Russia and China, as Guaidó did with the US government prior to his self-appointment, in order to obtain their support for my presidency. Once again, following the Venezuelan precedent, getting recognition from such powerful nations will mean that my presidency will be legitimate.

Of course, Russia and China will want something in return for recognizing me as president of the United States. Most likely they will want unfettered access to our country’s vast natural resources. The relationship between the new self-declared president of Venezuela and the United States has also established a precedent regarding such a quid pro quo. Less than a week after the Trump administration recognized Guaidó as the legitimate president of Venezuela, US National Security Advisor John Bolton stated, "We're in conversation with major American companies now … It'll make a big difference to the United States economically if we can have American oil companies really invest in and produce the oil capabilities in Venezuela." 

Naturally, it is not only my personal thirst for power and the desire of Russia and China to access our natural resources that are motivating factors behind my declaration as president and foreign support for our new democratic process. There is also the need for humanitarian intervention to end the suffering endured by so many US Americans.

Clearly, there exists a humanitarian crisis in the United States. A Harvard Medical School study revealed that some 44,000 people die annually in the United States due to a lack of access to affordable health care. This number dwarfs the amount of deaths that have occurred in Venezuela during that country's economic crisis. These needless deaths from lack of affordable health care are occurring in a country that spends $700 billion annually on its military. Furthermore, 23 percent of children in the world's richest nation live in poverty, according to a report published by UNICEF. The report ranks the 35 most economically advanced nations in the world with regard to child poverty and the United States places 34th on the list.

Please go to CounterPunch to read the entire article.

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