Friday, December 9, 2016

#2855: Is Mad Dog Resilient To Serco's 8(a) Red-Switch Murders, Boeing's Zulu Stand-Down Bridge?

United States Marine Field McConnell 
Plum City Online - (AbelDanger.net
December 9, 2016

1. Abel Danger (AD) has explained to James "Mad Dog" Mattis and his fellow Marines why they – and the country to which they have sworn allegiance – have no resilience to Serco's 8(a) Defense Red Switch Network murders if they continue to allow Serco's client Boeing to broadcast stand-down orders over the Federal Bridge Certification Authority in Zulu time.

2. AD has identified James Logan Jones Jr. – appointed as 32nd commandant of the Marine Corps in the Clinton administration – as the man who relayed stand-down orders through the Boeing HQ in Chicago and the Boeing E4Bs deployed over Washington while Serco shareholders authorized the 8(a) Red Switch murders of nearly 3,000 Americans on 9/11.

3. AD has explained why Gen. Mattis must have his resilience teams in the Marine Corps Intelligence Activity (MCIA) monitor the federal bridge for unlawful stand down orders and to "be polite, be professional but have a plan to kill everyone you meet."

4. United States Marine Field McConnell – Global Operations Director of Abel Danger – is asking for a meeting with President-elect Trump and Gen. Mattis to explain how Boeing was targeted with stand-down orders over the federal bridge on 9/11 and to explore Boeing's potential role in building a pilot monorail project along Route 66 – http://eazeway.org/Welcome.html – for a more community and state-based approach to the resilience challenges facing the United States.


Donald Trump on 9/11 "BOMBS EXPLODED SIMULTANEOUSLY"

Route 66 - Natalie Cole and Diana Krall 

"Resilience 
The term "resilience" refers to the ability to adapt to changing conditions and withstand and rapidly recover from disruption due to emergencies. Whether it is resilience towards acts of terrorism, cyber attacks, pandemics, and catastrophic natural disasters, our national preparedness is the shared responsibility of all levels of government, the private and nonprofit sectors, and individual citizens."

"NORAD Stand-Down 
The Prevention of Interceptions of the Commandeered Planes It is standard operating procedure (SOP) to scramble jet fighters whenever a jetliner goes off course or radio contact with it is lost. Between September 2000 and June 2001, interceptors were scrambled 67 times. 1 In the year 2000 jets were scrambled 129 times. 2

There are several elements involved in domestic air defense. The air traffic control system continuously monitors air traffic and notifies NORAD of any deviations of any aircraft from their flight-paths or loss of radio contact. NORAD monitors air and space traffic continuously and is prepared to react immediately to threats and emergencies. It has the authority to order units from the Air National Guard, the Air Force, or other armed services to scramble fighters in pursuit of jetliners in trouble. Routine interception procedures were not followed on September 11th, 2001.

Layered Failures

The air defense network had, on September 11th, predictable and effective procedures for dealing with just such an attack. Yet it failed to respond in a timely manner until after the attack was over, more than an hour and a half after it had started. The official timeline describes a series of events and mode of response in which the delays are spread out into a number of areas. There are failures upon failures, in what might be described as a strategy of layered failures, or failure in depth. The failures can be divided into four types.

Failures to report: Based on the official timeline, the FAA response times for reporting the deviating aircraft were many times longer than the prescribed times.

Failures to scramble: NORAD, once notified of the off-course aircraft, failed to scramble jets from the nearest bases.

Failures to intercept: Once airborne, interceptors failed to reach their targets because they flew at small fractions of their top speeds and/or in the wrong directions.

Failures to redeploy: Fighters that were airborne and within interception range of the deviating aircraft were not redeployed to pursue them.

Had not there been multiple failures of each type, one or more parts of the attack could have been thwarted. NORAD had time to protect the World Trade Center even given the unbelievably late time, 8:40, when it claims to have first been notified. It had time to protect the South Tower and Washington even given its bizarre choice of bases from which to scramble planes. And it still had ample opportunity to protect both New York City and Washington even if it insisted that all interceptors fly subsonic, simply by redeploying airborne fighters." 

"James Logan Jones, Jr. (born December 19, 1943) is a retired United States Marine Corps general and the former United States National Security Advisor. During his military career, he served as Commander, United States European Command (COMUSEUCOM) and Supreme Allied Commander Europe (SACEUR) from 2003 to 2006 and as the 32nd Commandant of the Marine Corps from July 1999 to January 2003. Jones retired from the Marine Corps on February 1, 2007, after 40 years of service.

After retiring from the Marine Corps, Jones remained involved in national security and foreign policy issues. In 2007, Jones served as chairman of the Congressional Independent Commission on the Security Forces of Iraq,[1] which investigated the capabilities of the Iraqi police and armed forces. In November 2007, he was appointed by the U.S. Secretary of State as special envoy for Middle East security. He served as chairman of the Atlantic Council from June 2007 to January 2009, when he assumed the post of National Security Advisor which he held until November 2010. …

On April 21, 1999, Jones was nominated for appointment to the grade of general and assignment as the 32nd commandant of the Marine Corps. He was promoted to general on June 30, 1999, and assumed the post on July 1, 1999. He served as commandant until January 2003, turning over the reins to General Michael Hagee[8]

Among other innovations during his career as Marine Corps commandant, Jones oversaw the Marine Corps' development of MARPAT camouflage uniforms, and the adoption of the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program (MCMAP). These replaced M81 Woodland uniforms and the LINE combat system, respectively.”

"The Marine Corps Intelligence Activity (MCIA), created in 1987,[1] is a field activity headquarters, U.S. Marine Corps, and a member of both the Defense Intelligence Agency and the United States Intelligence Community. The MCIA describes itself as: "a vital part of military intelligence 'corporate enterprise,' and functions in a collegial, effective manner with other service agencies and with the joint intelligence centers of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and Unified Commands."

The Marine Corps Intelligence Activity mission is to provide intelligence services to the Marine Corps and the U.S. Intelligence Community. These services are based on expeditionary mission profiles in littoral areas. It supports the development of service doctrine, force structure, training and education, and acquisition.

MCIA determines what missions the Corps needs to carry out as well as who will need to be trained for that mission. MCIA is in partnership with Marine Corps Intelligence the Office of Naval Intelligence and Office of Coast Guard Intelligence in the National Maritime Intelligence-Integration Office and at Marine Corps Base Quantico in Quantico, Virginia."

"Route 66
If you're looking for great displays of neon signs, mom-and-pop motels in the middle of nowhere, or kitschy Americana, do as the song says and "get your kicks on Route 66."

Between Chicago, Illinois and Los Angeles, California

The romance of Route 66 continues to captivate people around the world. Running between Chicago and Los Angeles, "over two thousand miles all the way" in the words of the popular R&B anthem, this legendary old road passes through the heart of the United States on a diagonal trip that takes in some of the country's most archetypal roadside scenes. If you're looking for great displays of neon signs, rusty middle-of-nowhere truck stops, or kitschy Americana, do as the song says and "get your kicks on Route 66."

But perhaps the most compelling reason to follow Route 66 is to experience the road’s ingrained time line of contemporary America. Before it was called Route 66, and long before it was even paved in 1926, this corridor was traversed by the National Old Trails Highway, one of the country's first transcontinental highways. For three decades before and after World War II, Route 66 earned the title "Main Street of America" because it wound through small towns across the Midwest and Southwest, lined by hundreds of cafés, motels, gas stations, and tourist attractions. During the Great Depression, hundreds of thousands of farm families, displaced from the Dust Bowl, made their way west along Route 66 to California, following what John Steinbeck called "The Mother Road" in his vivid portrait, The Grapes of Wrath. After World War II, many thousands more expressed their upward mobility by leaving the industrial East, bound for good jobs in the suburban idyll of Southern California—again following Route 66, which came to embody the demographic shift from the Rust Belt to the Sun Belt.

Beginning in the late 1950s and continuing gradually over the next 25 years, old Route 66 was bypassed section by section as the high-speed Interstate highways were completed. Finally, after the last stretch of freeway was completed in 1984, Route 66 was officially decommissioned. The old route is now designated Historic Route 66

Though it is no longer a main route across the country, Route 66 has retained its mystique in part due to the very same effective hype, hucksterism, and boosterism that animated it through its half-century heyday. It was a Route 66 sight, the marvelous Meramec Caverns, that gave the world the bumper sticker. And it was here on Route 66 that the great American driving vacation first flourished. Billboards and giant statues along the highway still hawk a baffling array of roadside attractions, tempting passing travelers to view giant blue whales, to see live rattlesnakes and other wild creatures on display in roadside menageries, or to stay at "Tucumcari Tonite." 

 The same commercial know-how and shameless self-promotion has helped the towns along the old route stay alive. Diners and motels play up their Route 66 connections, and many bona fide Route 66 landmarks are kept in business by nostalgic t ravelers intent on experiencing a taste of this endlessly endangered American experience. That said, many quirky old motels and cafés hang on by a thread of hope, sit vacant, or survive in memory only—all for want of an Interstate exit. In fact, of all the roads covered in this book, Route 66 has perhaps felt the greatest impact from the modern Interstate world; for many stretches you'll be forced to leave the old two-lane and follow the super slabs that have been built right on top of the old road.

Route 66 passes through a marvelous cross-section of American scenes, from the cornfields of Illinois all the way to the golden sands and sunshine of Los Angeles, passing by such diverse environs as the Grand Canyon, the Native American communities of the desert Southwest, the small-town Midwest heartlands of Oklahoma and the Ozarks, as well as the gritty streets of St. Louis and Chicago

Whether you are motivated by an interest in history, feel a nostalgic yearning for the "good old days" Route 66 has come to represent, or simply want to experience firsthand the amazing diversity of people and landscapes that line its path, Route 66 offers an unforgettable journey into America, then and now."

Yours sincerely,


Field McConnell, United States Naval Academy, 1971; Forensic Economist; 30 year airline and 22 year military pilot; 23,000 hours of safety; Tel: 715 307 8222

David Hawkins Tel: 604 542-0891 Forensic Economist; former leader of oil-well blow-out teams; now sponsors Grand Juries in CSI Crime and Safety Investigation

5 comments:

  1. I think you have it all wrong Boeing donates $1 million to Trump’s inauguration … before Twitter tirade . I think they are part of the whole game along with Rolls Royce otherwise they would have said something . They didnt appoint a gay person to be in charge for nothing . In case you havent noticed most of those involved are gays .

    ReplyDelete
  2. What a good idea from Trump Trump team memo on climate change alarms Energy Department staff , http://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-trump-climate-idUSKBN13Y2R6 A few of them turn and its RECO ..

    ReplyDelete
  3. Another hero , looks like Trump has stirred them up about time too . Rep. Tulsi Gabbard Introduces ‘Stop Arming Terrorists Act’http://www.infowars.com/rep-tulsi-gabbard-introduces-stop-arming-terrorists-act/

    ReplyDelete
  4. Me thinks Mr Mad Dog may be dirty...Working 4 the man??

    ReplyDelete

Who's visiting Abel Danger
view a larger version of the map below at whos.amung.us

You Too can be a CAPTAIN SHERLOCK